California Avocados are Ripe for a Takeover

Despite facing some of the world’s most difficult growing conditions, California Avocado growers anticipate exporting an additional 1-million pounds of fruit in 2018. 

nur-afni-setiyaningrum-50103-unsplash.jpg

California avocados are one of the more volatile products to grow. Environmental factors such as flooding, drought, high winds, and fire, coupled with the crop’s sensitive growing conditions make producing a consistent product very difficult. Despite these challenges, Californian growers appear poised for a takeover.  

foodism360-488357-unsplash.jpg

Weather is by far the number one factor affecting California avocado growth. Too little water and the fruit will mature slowly, never reaching it’s ideal size before being picked. Too much water and the fruit will ripen on the tree causing overripe produce to arrive on the market. High winds can also cause the fruit to be blown off the trees, which then cannot be sold to the market. Although 2017 saw an unusually wet rainy season, 2018 has seen high winds and drought conditions return to California. Despite these setbacks, volume is set to increase causing an unusually profitable spring into summer season.

 

“In fact volume should be up and prices should be down”

Volume in February experienced typical lows, but Californian growers are expecting to export much higher volumes in the coming weeks “as California’s crop combines with product still in the market from Mexico.”* “In fact volume should be up and prices should be down”* in comparison to last year, as growers anticipate exporting an additional 1 million pounds of fruit in 2018.

The nutritional benefits of avocados have been widely publicized in recent years, causing a near fever-pitch of excitement in North America.  This nutrient-rich fruit is packed with over 20 essential vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients, with one medium-sized avocado containing less than 50 calories. Avocados are naturally sodium and cholesterol free, and are virtually the only fruit that contains “the good fat”, also known as monounsaturated fat. It’s essential oils are incredibly useful both in and outside the body to promote the absorption of fat-soluble nutrients and retain moisture. Avocado’s soft, creamy texture makes it ideal for diners young and old. While the jury is split on just how much avocado is too much avocado, it’s nutritional benefits cannot be ignored.

brenda-godinez-227272-unsplash.jpg

Avocados come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and are produced in over 57 tropical and subtropical climates. To ensure you’re purchasing a California avocado, look out for the “California” sticker, or enjoy one of its many other varieties!

 

Sources:

  1. *burfield, tom. “California Avocado Volume Ample as Season Starts.” The Packer, 23 Mar. 2018, www.thepacker.com/article/california-avocado-volume-ample-season-starts.

  2. “CALIFORNIA AVOCADO.” California Avocado Association - Recipes, Nutrition & More, www.californiaavocado.com/.